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Special Series

Wetlands Mitigation Banking Demonstration Study

Series No

Report No

Title/Description/Authors (listed alphabetically)

NTIS/Vol/Pg

Available Download

1992-WMB-01

92-WMB-1 

Wetlands Mitigation Banking Concepts
The report summarizes information on Wetlands Mitigation Banking (WMB). The report discusses variation in types of banks, the national perspective, issues associated with banking, and on evaluation of WMBs to date. This report is an initial product of a Wetlands Mitigation Banking Demonstration Study being conducted by the u.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Institute for Water Resources. This report briefly describes that study.
Richard T Reppert
Jul 1992

NTIS: AD-A281058

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 35

1992-WMB-01     

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( pdf, 1.74 MB )  

1994-WMB-02

94-WMB-2 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study, Wetland Mitigation Banking: Resources Document
This report provides detailed information on vanous types of banks and similar compensatory mitigation mechanisms, statistical and institutional infonnation on all existing banks, an introduction to fee-based compensatory mitigation, and a comprehensive annotated bibliography of the literature on wetland mitigation banking, These data were collected by the US AmlY Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources (IWR) during the tirst phase of a two-phase National Wetland Mitigation Banking Study, The Enviromnental Law Institute contributed much of this infonnation from its study of wetland mitigation banking which was sponsored by IWR and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Robert Brumbaugh ; Jamie Dycus ; Katie Goldberg ; Moira McDonald ; James McElfish ; Richard T Reppert ; Lisa Vogel
Jan 1994

NTIS: AD-A288569

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 139

1994-WMB-02     

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( pdf, 1.1 MB )  

1994-WMB-03

94-WMB-3 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study - Expanding Opportunities for Successful Mitigation: The Private Credit Market Alternative
This report: (l)explains the concept and functioning of private markets in wetland mitigation credits; (2 ) describes the potential to help the Federal wetland regulatory program achieve the national goal of no-net-loss in wetland function and acreage; and (3) explains the regulatory conditions necessary for the widespread emergence and ecological success of this mitigation alternative. This report was prepared as a part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Institute for Water Resources National Wetland Mitigation Banking Study. The vast majority of mitigation banks today are single-user banks--largely developed to provide the sponsor's compensatory mitigation needs. By contrast, private mitigation credit markets would encourage entrepreneurs to establish commercial mitigation banks from which credits would be sold to wetland developers in need of compensatory mitigation. Such markets could help the nation achieve no-netloss of wetlands by increasing the opportunity to obtain successful conpensatory mitigation for permitted wetland losses.
Dennis King ; Paul Scodari ; Leonard Shabman
Jan 1994

NTIS: AD-A288554

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 75

1994-WMB-03     

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( pdf, 1.9 MB )  

1994-WMB-04

94-WMB-4 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study First Phase Report
This report is part of a series of reports which are being published during the National Study. General background information pertaining to wetland mitigation banking and the scope of the national study were the subjects of a report published during the first year of the study.
Robert Brumbaugh ; Richard T Reppert
Jan 1994

NTIS: AD-A288491

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 96

1994-WMB-04     

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( pdf, 2.31 MB )  

1994-WMB-05

94-WMB-5 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study - An Examination of Wetlands Programs: Opportunities for Compensatory Mitigation
This report is part of a series of reports that are being published during the National Wetland Mitigation Banking Study. General background information pertaining to wetland mitigation banking and the scope of the National Study were the subjects of a report published during the first year of the study.
Amy Doll
Mar 1994

NTIS: AD-A288495

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 104

1994-WMB-05     

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( pdf, 1.16 MB )  

1994-WMB-06

94-WMB-6 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study - Wetland Mitigation Banking
This document reports wetland mitigation banking experience to date. The Environmental Law Institute conducted an inventory of banks that sup~lemented information gathered as part of the National Wetland Mitlgation Banking Study conducted by the Instltute for Water Resources (IWR). Corps of Engineers Wetland mitigation banking, although practiced for more than fifteen years, is a concept still in its infancy. Existing mitigation banks were found to represent a variety of institutional arrangements, although single-client public works banks (mostly sponsored by state departments of transportation ) are the most common at present. At the time this report was prepared, there was little useful experi ence with public general use, and private entrepreneurial banks.
Environmental Law Institute
Feb 1994

NTIS: AD-A293925

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 186

1994-WMB-06     

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( pdf, 2.0 MB )  

1995-WMB-07

95-WMB-7 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study - Commercial Wetland Mitigation Credit Markets: Theory and Practice
The primary Federal regulatory program governing wetlands is authorized by Section 404 of the Clean Water Act. Similarly structured state and local permit programs also exist. In most instances, wetlands permitting is, by formal regulation, expected to follow a mitigation "sequence" where the applicant for a permit must first show that the proposed activity has been designed to avoid wetlands to the maximum extent. If avoidance is not possible, then the minimization of filling must be achieved. Finally, if a permit is granted, compensation by restoration of degraded wetlands or by creation of wetlands from uplands is required on site (as close as possible to the permitted activity). Also, the same kind of wetland is to be provided.
Paul Scodari ; Leonard Shabman ; David White
Nov 1995

NTIS: AD-A316814

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 101

1995-WMB-07     

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( pdf, 1.7 MB )  

1995-WMB-08

95-WMB-8 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study- Watershed-based Wetlands Planning: A Case Study Report
This report describes case studies of watershed-based wetlands planning. The goals, scope, and circumstances surrounding these watershed-based wetland plans differ greatly. Therefore, this report makes no single and comparative assessment of the case studies. In fact, the cases were selected because they illustrate a range of issues associated with integrating wetland management and watershed planning, and a variety of planning approaches. Also, all of the case studies have a wetland component, which is not true of watershed planning in general.
Leonard Shabman ; David White
Dec 1995

NTIS: AD-A321525

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 57

1995-WMB-08     

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( pdf, 1.4 MB )  

1995-WMB-99

WMB-TP-2 

National Wetland Mitigation Banking Study: Technical and Procedural Support to Mitigation Banking Guidance
This document elaborates on certain policy considerations which were presented in the Federal Mitigation Banking Guidance. This support to the guidance is limited in scope to wetland systems; although Section 404 of the Clean Water Act extends the applicability of mitigation banking to wetlands and other aquatic environments, it is recognized that its principle role will be to compensate for unavoidable wetland losses. Accordingly, this document recognizes this programmatic emphasis.
Institute for Water Resources
Dec 1995

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 41

1995-WMB-99     

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( pdf, 172 KB )  

1996-WMB-09

96-WMB-9 

National Wetlands Mitigation Banking Study- Commercial Wetland Mitigation Credit Ventures: 1995 National Survey
Federal wetland regulations pursuant to Section 404 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) require applicants for wetland discharge permits to satisfy "mitigation sequencing" rules as a precondition for permitting. Mitigation sequencing requires permit applicants to first avoid and minimize wetland impacts to the extent practicable, and then provide compensatory mitigation for any remaining wetland impacts. Compensation is expected in the form of wetlands created from uplands, the restoration of former or severely degraded wetlands, or the enhancement of functioning wetlands.
Robert Brumbaugh ; Paul Scodari
Aug 1996

NTIS: AD-A321523

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 115

1996-WMB-09     

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( pdf, 6.9 MB )  

1996-WMB-99

WMB-TP-1 

National Wetland Mitigation Banking Study: Model Banking Instrument
The purpose of this Banking Instrument is to establish guidelines and responsibilities for the establishment, use, operation, and maintenance of the Bank. The Bank will be used for compensatory mitigation for unavoidable impacts to waters of the United States including wetlands which result from activities authorized under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, [list other applicable programs for which credits from the bank are expected to be used, e.g., Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act, the Swampbuster provisions of the Food Security Act, State or local wetland regulatory programs, other Federal programs] provided such use has met all applicable requirements and is authorized by the appropriate authority.
Institute for Water Resources
May 1996

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1

Pages: 11

1996-WMB-99     

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( pdf, 69 KB )  

1998-WMB-01

98-WMB-WP 

National Wetland Mitigation Banking Study: The Early Mitigation Banks: A Follow-up Review
In 1992, the Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources conducted a detailed case study survey collecting information on 22 pioneer wetland mitigation banks in the nation. The case studies demonstrated the wide range of characteristics of wetland mitigation banks in existence, including various classes of wetlands, sponsorship (both public and private), mitigation objectives, institutional arrangements, implementation plan, and long-term maintenance and monitoring. Evaluation of the case study banks revealed that at least one-third of these mitigation banks were experiencing some technical and/or administrative deficiencies. As a follow -up, this report examines the status of the mitigation banks originally reported as operating unsuccessfully and takes an in-depth review at the various technical and administrative deficiencies these mitigation banks experienced. In 1996, interviews were conducted with sponsors and resource and regulatory agency representatives to assess the current status of these eight mitigation banks.
Robert Brumbaugh ; Fari Tabatabai
Jan 1998

NTIS: 

Volume: 1
Total Volumes: 1



1998-WMB-01     

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( pdf, 414 KB )  

 
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